Question / Taiwan: Politics and Government

Question for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
UIN 66189, tabled on 29 October 2021

Question
Lisa Nandy
Labour

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment her Department has made of the security situation in Taiwan.

Answer
Amanda Milling
Conservative

Answered on
3 November 2021

HMG considers the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue. We are concerned by any activity which raises tensions and risks destabilising the status quo and have been clear that the numerous Chinese military flights near Taiwan at the beginning of October were not conducive to peace and stability in the region. We underscored the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait alongside partners in the G7 Foreign and Development Ministers’ communique in May and G7 Leaders’ communique in June.

 

Question / Driving Licences: Reciprocal Arrangements

Question for Department for Transport
UIN 66167, tabled on 29 October 2021

Question
Mr Gregory Campbell
Democratic Unionist Party

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with his international counterparts on expanding the list of designated countries where an exchange agreement is in place for recognition of driving licences.

Answer
Trudy Harrison
Conservative

Answered on
3 November 2021

On 20 May 2021, legislation was introduced to designate specified driving licences issued in the Cayman Islands, Taiwan, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates and North Macedonia for exchange in GB.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is currently dealing with requests for reciprocal driving licence exchange agreements from Malaysia, Serbia and Sri Lanka and continues to work with the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office to identify further opportunities.

The DVLA has also been in contact with the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators to gauge interest in reciprocal licence exchange arrangements among US licensing authorities.

 

Question / China: Taiwan

Question for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
UIN 58751, tabled on 19 October 2021

Question
Andrew Rosindell
Conservative

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the implications for her Department’s policies of recent reports that China will be able to invade Taiwan by 2025.

Answer
Amanda Milling
Conservative

Answered on
27 October 2021

We remain concerned by any action which raises tensions and risks destabilising the status quo. Her Majesty’s Government considers the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue.

 

Question / Taiwan: Politics and Government

Question for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
UIN 59700, tabled on 20 October 2021

Question
Dr Julian Lewis
Conservative

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions she has had with allies on the future security of Taiwan.

Answer
Amanda Milling
Conservative

Answered on
25 October 2021

Her Majesty’s Government considers the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue. We are concerned by any activity which raises tensions and risks destabilising the status quo, and underscored the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait alongside partners in the recent G7 Foreign and Development Ministers’ and Leaders’ communiques.

Question / Taiwan: Sustainable Development

Question for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
UIN 56423, tabled on 15 October 2021

Question
Rosie Cooper
Labour

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help ensure that Taiwan can work with the international community effectively to help achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals and recover from the covid-19 pandemic.

Answer
Amanda Milling
Conservative

Answered on
25 October 2021

Taiwan plays a valuable but voluntarily role in the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, despite not being a member state of the UN. The UK Government welcomes Taiwan’s contribution and continues to work closely with Taiwan on this and other matters, including the fight against Covid-19. More broadly, the UK support’s Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organisations where statehood is not a prerequisite. The UK believes that the people of Taiwan have a valuable contribution to make on issues of global concern and this includes on sustainable development and their effective fight against the pandemic.

 

Offshore Wind: a UK-Taiwanese success story

In recent years Taiwan has also been a pioneering leader in the field of green energy and as an island, much like the UK, offshore wind has been a big focus of that push. Similarly to the UK Government, the Taiwanese Government is committed to a transition to green energy.

In this paper, the British-Taiwanese APPG highlights the significant achievements that have already been delivered. But there is scope for closer cooperation in this and other sectors too and the APPG urges the British Government to do the right thing and work closer with Taiwan on these issues, starting by extending a full invite to Taiwan to participate in the COP26 Conference in Glasgow this November.

As the offshore wind space shows, closer relations between the UK and Taiwan are beneficial for both of these island nations. Furthermore, those benefits also extend to the wider world.

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Question / UN Climate Conference 2021: Taiwan

Question for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
UIN HL2574, tabled on 9 September 2021

Question
Lord Blencathra
Conservative

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they plan to take to allow Taiwanese representatives to participate in informal gatherings at COP26.

Answer
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Conservative

Answered on
23 September 2021

The UK Government welcomes the contribution Taiwan is voluntarily making to combat climate change, despite not being a signatory to the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The UK Government has consistently stated its support for Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organisations where statehood is not a requirement and where we believe Taiwan has a valuable contribution to make on issues of global concern. This includes climate change, which recognises no territorial boundaries.

 

 

Question / UN Climate Conference 2021: Taiwan

Question for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office
UIN HL2573, tabled on 9 September 2021

Question
Lord Blencathra
Conservative

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they plan to take to ensure that Taiwan is represented at COP26.

Answer
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Conservative

Answered on
23 September 2021

The UK Government welcomes the contribution Taiwan is voluntarily making to combat climate change, despite not being a signatory to the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The UK Government has consistently stated its support for Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organisations where statehood is not a requirement and where we believe Taiwan has a valuable contribution to make on issues of global concern. This includes climate change, which recognises no territorial boundaries.

 

Taiwan Brings a Trendy Look to Rush Weaving at London Craft Week

The traditional craft of Taiwanese rush weaving is set to feature at this year’s London Craft Week 2021, with the exhibition Lines of Possibilities: Taiwanese Rush Weaving. Supported by the Ministry of Culture, Taiwan, and created in collaboration with the Taiwan Yuan-Li Handiwork Association, the exhibition will mark the fifth year Taiwan has participated at the festival. The exhibition will run from the 30th September to 10th October, giving UK audiences the chance to experience the centuries-old craft at London’s iconic [email protected]

Taiwan’s particular strain of cyperus malaccensis is unique to the island. Famous for its triangular shape and firm texture, the plant provides greater variety in pattern design, giving rush-woven products a distinctive look and a higher quality. Taiwan’s indigenous Taukat people began weaving this rush plant into high quality mats to sit on during the mid-eighteenth century. Soon spreading amongst local Hakka and Minnan ethnic groups, centuries of interdependence and integration, from dynastic times to the Japanese Empire and now the modern day, have made Taiwanese rush weaving a unique multicultural craftsmanship.

Lines of Possibilities: Taiwanese Rush Weaving will be presented in a hybrid format, with the physical exhibition being accompanied by an online viewing room (https://www.linesofpossibilities.com), showing off a variety of products from the modern rush weaving industry. The online viewing room also presents a short documentary on the development of the rush weaving industry in the small town of Yuanli, Miaoli, drawing on the personal experiences of the town’s craftspeople. The exhibition will also give the British public the opportunity to learn the basics of rush weaving themselves, with interactive workshops running on the 2nd and 9th October between 14:00 and 15:00.

“The exhibition isn’t just about presenting Taiwanese craftsmanship,” noted Dr. Chen Pin-Chuan, Director of the Cultural Division at the Taipei Representative Office in the UK, “it’s about finding similarities and noting differences in Taiwanese and British culture. Both island nations have a tradition of plant weaving and basketry – so this exhibition presents an opportunity to further explore what our countries have in common, and foster interest in each other’s craft industries.”

London Craft Week is one of the largest annual festivals celebrating craft, attracting established and emerging makers, designers, brand and galleries from around the world. Now in its seventh year, the festival will feature more than 300 events, exhibitions, workshops and forums, creating a spiritual feast for lovers of craft. With authenticity at the heart of London Craft Week, Lines of Possibilities: Taiwanese Rush Weaving is set to present the island nation’s creativity and craftsmanship on the international stage.

 

 

Question / Taiwan Strait: HMS Queen Elizabeth

Question for Ministry of Defence
UIN 40727, tabled on 18 August 2021

Mr Tobias Ellwood
Conservative

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether there are plans to sail the Queen Elizabeth aircraft carrier through the Taiwan Strait during its visit to the Indo-pacific in July 2021.

James Heappey
Conservative

Answered on
6 September 2021

I can confirm that no element of the Carrier Strike Group sailed through the Taiwan Strait in July 2021. The Royal Navy will next navigate the Taiwan Strait when navigationally expeditious to do so and in accordance with international law and operational requirements. To preserve operational security, the Royal Navy does not discuss the specifics of the operational routings of ships in advance.