Question / World Health Assembly: Taiwan

Q Asked by Martin Vickers (Cleethorpes)
Asked on: 28 March 2019

Department of Health and Social Care
World Health Assembly: Taiwan / 238323

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support Taiwan’s participation in the World Health Assembly as an observer; and whether his Department has encouraged Taiwan to participate in technical meetings of the World Health Organisation.

A Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 05 April 2019

The Department continues to support the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on this topic. The Government is working with likeminded countries to lobby the World Health Organization (WHO) at official level to issue an invitation to Taiwan to observe the World Health Assembly (WHA) in May.

The United Kingdom continues to support Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organisations where statehood is not a prerequisite and where Taiwan can make a valuable contribution. The UK believes the WHA and related technical meetings of the WHO meet these criteria.

Question / China: Taiwan

Q Asked by Lord Dholakia
Asked on: 14 January 2019

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
China: Taiwan / HL12785

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with the government of the People’s Republic of China about their “one country, two systems” policy towards Taiwan.

A Answered by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Answered on: 23 January 2019

The British Government has routine discussions with the People’s Republic of China on the issue of Taiwan, such as during the Foreign Secretary’s UK-China Strategic Dialogue (July 2018). We maintain that the issue should be settled through constructive dialogue, in line with the views of the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait.

Question / China: Taiwan

Q Asked by Lord Dholakia
Asked on: 14 January 2019

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
China: Taiwan / HL12786

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of any risks to regional peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait.

A Answered by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Answered on: 23 January 2019

In his 2 January speech, Chinese leader Xi Jinping urged Taiwan to accept reunification with China, restating China’s long-held position that it can use all necessary measures, including force, to secure this aim. We oppose any action which raises tensions in the region and hinders the chances of peaceful settlement of any issues. In line with our longstanding position on Taiwan we encourage Taiwan and China to engage in constructive dialogue to resolve this issue, taking into account the views of the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait.

Question / Renewable Energy: Taiwan

Q Asked by Mr George Howarth (Knowsley)
Asked on: 21 November 2018

Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Renewable Energy: Taiwan / 194065

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to co-operate with Taiwan on renewable energy; and whether his Department plans actively to engage with Taiwan’s delegation at the 24th Session of the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in December 2018.

A Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 29 November 2018

Cooperation on renewable energy forms part of the UK’s commercial and economic ties with Taiwan. In 2017 we agreed to initiate an official-level dialogue on energy as a component of the annual Trade Talks. The first meeting took place in June 2018 in London between officials from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Department for International Trade, and a delegation led by Taiwan’s Bureau of Energy. The dialogue focussed on renewable energy, particularly offshore wind, grid stability and smart energy systems. Both sides agreed that there was value in further dialogue and opportunities for businesses to work together on renewable energy.

Broader energy and climate change cooperation between the UK and Taiwan is part of our economic and commercial relationship. We expect this engagement to continue in the margins of the 24th Conference of the Parties under the UNFCCC next month, though no formal plans have yet been made. Broad cooperation is vital for tackling this global issue.

Question / Taiwan: Climate Change

Q Asked by Scott Mann (North Cornwall)
Asked on: 19 November 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Taiwan: Climate Change / 192926

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department recognises Taiwan’s efforts and contribution on combating climate change; and if his Department will support Taiwan’s participation as an observer in the 24th Session of the Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change which will take place in Poland in December 2018.

A Answered by: Mark Field
Answered on: 27 November 2018

The British Government welcomes the contribution Taiwan voluntarily makes in combating climate change, despite not being a signatory to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, and we continue to work closely with Taiwan on this matter. The British Government has also consistently stated its support for Taiwan’s participation in international organisations where we believe Taiwan has a valuable contribution to make on issues of global concern. This includes the issue of climate change, which does not recognise the concept of territorial boundaries. Taiwan is sending a delegation to Katowice.

Question / Interpol: Taiwan

Q Asked by Mr Philip Hollobone (Kettering)
Asked on: 06 November 2018

Home Office
Interpol: Taiwan / 188779

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will support the granting of observer status to Taiwan at the 87th Interpol General Assembly in Dubai from 18 to 21 November 2018.

A Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 12 November 2018

INTERPOL is an international police organisation which has a crucial role in ensuring co-operation on matters of international criminality.

The British Government continues to hold the view that the people of Taiwan have a meaningful contribution to make towards global issues such as organised crime. The UK has not made any representations to secure Taiwan’s observer status at INTERPOL this year. However, government officials are discussing this issue with international partners.

Question / Interpol: Taiwan

Q Asked by Lord Steel of Aikwood
Asked on: 05 November 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Interpol: Taiwan / HL11292

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what representations, if any, they have made to secure an observer place for Taiwan at the forthcoming General Assembly of Interpol, and for that country to have access to the I-24/7 global police communications system.

A Answered by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Answered on: 15 November 2018

The British Government believes that the people of Taiwan have a valuable contribution to make towards global issues such as organised crime. Their involvement would, in our view, improve co-operation on issues that pose a risk to the international community, including the United Kingdom and our own people. Although the UK has not made any representations to secure Taiwan’s observer status at INTERPOL this year, we are discussing this issue with international partners, including those countries on the INTERPOL Executive Committee.

Question / Taiwan: China

Q Asked by Lord Steel of Aikwood
Asked on: 11 July 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Taiwan: China / HL9452

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will take measures to protect British Airways and any other UK companies from being pressured into changing the designation of Taiwan to Taiwan, China.

A Answered by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Answered on: 19 July 2018

Her Majesty’s Government’s long-standing policy on Taiwan has not changed. The British government refers to Taiwan as simply “Taiwan” and, when included in a list of places, does so under an inclusive heading, such as “country/territory” or “world locations”. When guidance has been sought from Her Majesty’s Government on the terminology to use, we have been clear about the British Government’s terminology for Taiwan.

Private companies and organisations should be able to decide the terminology that they use to list destinations. UK companies should not be placed under political pressure to make changes. Foreign and Commonwealth Office Officials have registered our concern with the Chinese Government on this point.

Question / China: Multinational Companies

Q Asked by Andrea Jenkyns (Morley and Outwood)
Asked on: 02 July 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
China: Multinational Companies / 159672

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he has taken to join allies of the UK in countering China’s (a) pressuring of airlines to comply with its nomenclature for Taiwan and (b) attempting in other ways to impose its political ideology on international companies.

A Answered by: Mark Field
Answered on: 10 July 2018

Her Majesty’s Government’s long-standing policy on Taiwan has not changed. The British Government refers to Taiwan as simply “Taiwan” and, when included in a list of places, does so under an inclusive heading, such as “country/territory” or “world locations”. When guidance has been sought from HMG on the terminology to use, we have been clear about the British Government’s terminology for Taiwan.

Private companies and organisations should be able to decide the terminology that they use to list destinations. UK companies should not be placed under political pressure to make changes. FCO Officials have registered our concern with the Chinese Government on this point.

Question / China: Multinational Companies

Q Asked by Andrea Jenkyns (Morley and Outwood)
Asked on: 02 July 2018

Foreign and Commonwealth Office
China: Multinational Companies / 159671

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the implications are for his policies of China’s (a) pressuring British Airways and other airlines to use its nomenclature for Taiwan on their websites and (b) interfering in other ways in the free operation of international business.

A Answered by: Mark Field
Answered on: 10 July 2018

Her Majesty’s Government’s long-standing policy on Taiwan has not changed. The Government refers to Taiwan as simply “Taiwan” and, when included in a list of places, does so under an inclusive heading, such as “country/territory” or “world locations”. When guidance has been sought from HMG on the terminology to use, we have been clear about the British Government’s terminology for Taiwan.

Private companies and organisations should be able to decide the terminology that they use to list destinations. UK companies should not be placed under political pressure to make changes. FCO Officials have registered our concern with the Chinese Government on this point.